Events Archive

The Daughter of the Regiment


Single tickets for this event go on sale Aug. 15, 2016.

High comedy, romance and vocal fireworks. Marie (Rachele Gilmore), the adoptive daughter of 1,500 soldiers of a French army regiment, is the charming tomboy who has fallen in love with the handsome Tonio (René Barbera). Only by joining the regiment can the young local man be deemed fit by Marie’s “fathers” to win her hand.

Meanwhile, the Marquise of Birkenfeld (Cindy Sadler) knows the truth of Marie’s aristocratic birth and seeks to sweep the ingénue away from her regimental family and introduce her to high society and a marriage befitting her rank. Tonio must prevail over his lowly station if he and Marie are to find their way to love, against a backdrop of bel canto pyrotechnics, including Tonio’s famous tenor aria, “A mes amis,” marked by nine perilous high Cs.

The music of Donizetti’s masterpiece will be sung in French, mixed with a sparkling new English dialogue. Rod Caspers directs.

The Daughter of the Regiment features the Austin Opera Chorus and the Austin Opera Orchestra.

An opera in two acts, sung in French with English dialogue and English supertitles projected above the stage.

Cast

Marie — Rachele Gilmore, soprano
Tonio — René Barbera, tenor
Sgt. Sulpice — Stefano de Peppo*, bass-baritone
The Marquise of Birkenfeld — Cindy Sadlermezzo-soprano

*Austin Opera debut


Production

Composer: Gaetano Donizetti | Libretto: Jules-Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges, Jean-François Bayard | English Dialogue: Rod Caspers, Chan Chandler | Sung in French with English  dialogue, with English supertitles.

Conductor: Richard Buckley | Stage Director: Rod Caspers | Chorus Master: Julian Reed


Synopsis currently unavailable. Please check back soon. It’s coming, we promise!  

The Flying Dutchman


Single tickets for this event go on sale Aug. 15, 2016.

Deliverance through love. Wagner’s powerful romantic opera, The Flying Dutchman, tells the supernatural tale of a captain cursed to navigate a ghost ship for all eternity — a punishment for invoking Satan during a treacherous ocean voyage.

Only once every seven years can the Dutchman (Wayne Tigges) go ashore for a fleeting moment to find the true love that can release him from his never-ending prison at sea. The beautiful Senta (Melody Moore) may be the key to the Dutchman’s salvation, but only if she would abandon her family, friends, and suitor on land.

Rising star Eric Einhorn returns to Austin to direct a powerhouse cast in this story of imagination, filled with lush orchestral writing and soaring vocalism, in its first Austin performances in a decade.

The Flying Dutchman features the Austin Opera Chorus and the Austin Opera Orchestra.

An opera in three acts, sung in German with English supertitles projected above the stage.

Cast

The Dutchman — Wayne Tigges, baritone
Senta — Melody Moore*, soprano
Erik — Clay Hilley*, tenor
Daland — Peter Volpe, bass 

*Austin Opera debut


Production

Composer & Librettist: Richard Wagner | Sung in German with English supertitles.

Conductor: Richard Buckley | Stage Director: Eric Einhorn | Chorus Master: Julian Reed


Act I

A violent storm has driven Daland’s ship several miles from his home on the Norwegian coast. Sending his crew off to rest, he leaves the watch in charge of a young steersman, who falls asleep as he sings a ballad about his girl (“Mit Gewitter und Sturm”). A ghostly schooner drops anchor next to Daland’s ship. Its captain steps ashore and, with increasing despair, reflects on his fate (“Die Frist ist um”): Once every seven years he may leave his ship to find a wife. If she is faithful, she will redeem him from his deathless wandering. If not, he is condemned to sail the ocean until Judgment Day. When Daland discovers the phantom ship, the stranger, who introduces himself as “a Dutchman,” tells him of his plight and offers gold and jewels for a night’s lodging. When he learns that Daland has a daughter, the Dutchman asks for her hand in marriage. Happy to have found a rich son-in-law, Daland agrees and sets sail for home.

Act II

Daland’s young daughter, Senta, is captivated by the portrait of a pale man in black—the Flying Dutchman—while her friends sit spinning under the watchful eye of Mary, Senta’s nurse. The girls tease Senta about her suitor, Erik, who is not a sailor but a hunter. When the superstitious Mary refuses to sing a ballad about the Dutchman, Senta sings it herself (“Traft ihr das Schiff im Meere an”). The song reveals that the Dutchman’s curse was put on him for a blasphemous oath. To Mary and the girls’ horror, Senta suddenly declares that she will be the one to save him. Erik enters with news of the sailors’ return, and Mary and the others hurry off. Erik reminds Senta of her father’s intention to find her a husband and asks her to plead his cause, but she remains distant (“Mein Herz, voll Treue bis zum Sterben”). Realizing how much the Dutchman’s picture means to her, he tells her of a frightening dream in which he saw her passionately embrace the Dutchman and sail away on his ship. Senta exclaims that this is what she must do, and the despairing Erik rushes away. A moment later, the Dutchman enters. Senta stands transfixed. Daland quickly follows and asks his daughter to welcome the stranger, whom he has brought to be her husband (“Mögst du, mein Kind”). After he has left, the Dutchman, who is equally moved by the meeting, asks Senta if she will accept him as her husband (Duet: “Wie aus der Ferne”). Unaware that she realizes who he is, he warns her of making a rash decision, but she ecstatically vows to be faithful to him unto death. Daland returns and is overjoyed to learn that his daughter has accepted the suitor.

Act III

At the harbor, the villagers celebrate the sailors’ return with singing and dancing (Chorus: “Steuermann, lass die Wacht!”). Perplexed by the strange silence aboard the Dutchman’s ship, they call out to the crew, inviting them to join the festivities. Suddenly the ghostly sailors are heard, mocking their captain’s quest in hollow chanting. The villagers run away in terror. Quiet returns and Senta enters, followed by the distressed Erik. He pleads with her not to marry the Dutchman, insisting that she has already pledged her love to him (“Willst jenes Tag’s”). The Dutchman, who has overheard them, loses all hope of salvation and goes toward his ship. Senta tries to stop him but he explains that since she has not yet proclaimed her vows before God, she will escape eternal damnation—the fate of those who betray him. His crew prepares to cast off and he declares that he is the Flying Dutchman of legend. Senta ecstatically replies that she knows who he is. As the ship pulls away, she throws herself into the sea, crying that she is faithful unto death, therefore redeeming the Dutchman.

The Manchurian Candidate

Austin Opera opens its 30th Anniversary Season on Sept. 17, 2016, with the one-night-only regional premiere of Pulitzer Prize-winning creators Kevin Puts and Mark Campbell’s acclaimed adaptation of The Manchurian Candidate.

Cold War intrigue culminates in thrilling suspense in this re-creation of the chilling Richard Condon novel. Sgt. Raymond Shaw (David Adam Moore) is the brainwashed, unknowing accomplice of a secret plot to overthrow the U.S. government through its presidential elections. Only Capt. Ben Marco (John Lindsey) — his fellow POW — stands between Shaw and the destiny crafted for him by a group of dark collaborators.

Semi-staged direction by Alison Moritz and projection design by Greg Emetaz will create a powerful, imaginative dramatization of the paranoiac tale, which will take place with the Austin Opera Orchestra on stage — less than two months before the 2016 presidential elections.

The Manchurian Candidate features the Austin Opera Chorus and the Austin Opera Orchestra.

An opera in two acts, sung in English with English supertitles projected above the stage.

Cast

Sgt. Raymond Shaw — David Adam Moore, baritone
Eleanor Iselin — Brenda Harris, soprano
Capt. Ben Marco — John Lindsey*, tenor
Sen. Johnny Iselin — Daniel Sumegi, bass baritone

*Austin Opera debut


Production

Composer: Kevin Puts | Librettist: Mark Campbell | Commissioned by Minnesota Opera. Sung in English with English supertitles.

Conductor: Richard Buckley | Stage Director: Alison Moritz | Projection Design: Greg Emetaz | Chorus Master: Julian Reed


Act I

Scene One – “The Ladies Garden Club of Northern New Jersey”  Mrs. Lowe introduces five soldiers, Ben Marco, Ed Mavole, Bobby Lembeck, Andrew Hanley and Raymond Shaw to her “garden club.” From the start, it is clear all is not as it should be. In fact, we are inside the brainwashed minds of the soldiers, who believe they are attending a ladies luncheon when in reality they are being displayed before a group of Communist officials. Mrs. Lowe (really Dr. Yen Lo) spotlights Raymond as the perfect assassin, one who can kill without computation or memory of the incident. In a demonstration to the Russian and Chinese audience, Raymond plays solitaire – when he uncovers the Queen of Diamonds, his mind is receptive to commands. Lowe suggests Raymond strangle Ed Mavole, the most popular member of their platoon, and he performs the terrible deed without hesitation. Next, under the same directive, he shoots Bobby Lembeck. The Communists are pleased. Marco is told to recommend Shaw for the Medal of Honor for being “a true American hero.”

Scene Two – the tarmac of Idewild Airport  Raymond greets his mother, Eleanor Iselin, with contempt. She has arranged a photo opportunity to praise her son’s courage, but also to advance the career of her husband and Raymond’s stepfather, Senator Johnny Iselin. Raymond angrily denounces both as frauds, and discloses that he has accepted a position at a New York newspaper, the Daily Press, hoping to distance himself from them both.

Scene Three – darkness  A McCarthy-esque television speech made by Johnny Iselin morphs into a recap of the garden club meeting. Night after night Captain Marco has had the same recurring dream depicting the deaths of Mavole and Lembeck.

Scene Four – the Army offices   Marco discusses his dream with General Tracy. His superior officer dismisses it as battle fatigue and assigns him to less demanding work as a press representative.

Scene Five – a press conference  Johnny Iselin interrupts the Defense Department’s budgetary press conference, brazenly waving a list of 207 Communists working inside the organization. Claiming this house cleaning is the responsibility of the Senate, he rushes out of the room as flashbulbs go off and television cameras roll. Marco tells the Secretary of Defense that he will manage the problem.

Scene Six – the office of the Daily Press  Raymond’s boss, Holborn Gaines, comments on Johnny’s spectacle and promises to stop him. He is about to have lunch with Senator Thomas Jordan, one of Johnny’s most formidable opponents. Raymond admits he once knew the senator’s daughter, Jocelyn.

Scene Seven – a bucolic setting on Long Island  Raymond recalls the summer he met “Jocie” when she saved him from a snakebite. He learns that her father became the sworn enemy of his mother. Raymond agrees with Senator Jordan’s characterization of Eleanor.

Now in love, Raymond suggests that he and Jocie run away together. Ever belligerent, Eleanor puts an end to the relationship.

Scene Eight – a train car  Captain Marco makes small talk with an attractive, yet mysterious, Rosie Chayney. They agree to meet at her apartment in New York.

Scene Nine – outside Raymond’s apartment  Marco emerges from the shadows and pulls Raymond aside, describing the strange dreams with the gun and the scarf. Not really wanting to discuss it further, Raymond admits he has received a letter from Corporal Hanley admitting exactly the same thing. Marco gives Raymond Rosie’s phone number, where he will be staying while in New York, in case Raymond wishes to discuss it further. As Marco leaves, Raymond’s telephone rings. He answers and then pulls out a deck of playing cards.

Scene Ten – the bedroom of Holborn Gaines  Early in the morning, Raymond shoots and kills his boss Holborn Gaines.

Scene Eleven – the Iselin’s home  Eleanor comments on the headlines reporting Gaines’ murder while Johnny rehearses a speech. She has decided to throw a costume party ostensibly to celebrate the return of Jocelyn Jordan, whose father’s favor she now hopes to garner to enhance their political position.

Scene Twelve – the Army offices  In response to Marco’s query about Corporal Hanley, General Tracy shows him some photographs. Just like Hanley, Marco recognizes Dr. Lo Yen and Berezovo, two people of interest to international security.

Scene Thirteen – the Iselin’s home  At the costume party, Raymond asks after Jocie. Eleanor proposes that he play solitaire until she appears. When the Queen of Diamonds is played, Eleanor (now clearly an agent for the Communists) begins to coach him for another murder, but is interrupted by Johnny, who announces Senator Jordan’s arrival. While Eleanor solicits Jordan’s support in another room, Jocie arrives, attired in a Queen of Diamonds costume. Completely under her spell, Raymond agrees to run away with her. Meanwhile, Jordan repulses Eleanor and declares that he will do everything possible to derail Johnny’s bid for the vice presidential nomination. Returning to the study, Eleanor is furious to discover Raymond has left with Jocie.

Act II

Scene One – Raymond’s apartment  Recently married, Raymond and Jocie revel in their mutual adoration. Marco drops by, learns the happy news, then insists that he speak to Raymond. Now alone, Jocie answers the ringing telephone, but no one is at the other end.

Scene Two – a bar  Marco reveals to Raymond that his Medal of Honor is based on a lie, and that the young sergeant killed both Mavole and Lembeck. Raymond doesn’t remember any of it, and Marco explains that he has been programmed to become a killing machine. Meanwhile, a bartender relays some domestic details to another customer. When she says “Why don’t you pass the time by playing a little game of solitaire,” Raymond instinctively asks for a deck of cards. At the moment the Queen of Diamonds is displayed, an absurd suggestion is made, and to Marco’s astonishment, Raymond dutifully performs the task. Marco begins to decode the master plan.

Scene Three – Raymond’s apartment/Rosie’s apartment  Both Raymond and Rosie watch the political convention on their respective televisions. Raymond receives a phone call and begins to play solitaire while Rosie and Marco share a tender moment, agreeing to marry. Marco suddenly realizes that the Queen of Diamonds is the trigger card.

At the Jordan’s home, Jocie announces her marriage to her father. Raymond slips into the apartment unnoticed. He shoots Jordan and then Jocie.

Scene Four – Raymond’s apartment  Raymond is under Eleanor’s spell. She commands him to assassinate the presidential nominee at the convention to clear the way for her husband’s succession. After she leaves, Marco arrives, determined to deprogram Raymond. Using the playing cards, he intends to learn Raymond’s most recent mission.

Scene Five – a small office near the convention floor  Marco relays what he has learned to the security agents. Rosie arrives unexpectedly, and in spite of his concern for her safety, refuses to leave.

Scene Six – the convention floor  The presidential nominee, his wife and children and the Iselins sit on the platform. While the nominee makes his opening remarks, Eleanor privately savors her accomplishments. A shot rings out and Eleanor falls dead. Another shot takes out Johnny. A third shot rings out as chaos ensues. Marco confesses to Rosie his reprogramming of Raymond’s mind, even if it cost him his own life.

UrbanNites at the Opera

UrbanNites.Event.Header.Barber

UrbanNites at the Opera is Austin Opera’s new group for young professionals and arts enthusiasts. Bringing together an exciting mix of people—from those familiar with opera to those just getting started—UrbanNites is a wonderful way to introduce yourself to this magnificent art form in a great social setting.

Join us for our next event on Thursday, April 28, at 6:30 pm, beginning with a reception in the Long Center’s Kodosky Lounge, followed by a performance of  Gioachino Rossini’s perennial favorite, The Barber of Seville at 7:30 pm in Dell Hall.

For $70 per person or $120 per couple, indulge in tasty hors d’oeuvres and complimentary wine, network and meet fun people, and enjoy best available seats for an incredible night at the opera.

Join UrbanNites and become part of the next generation of opera-lovers through this fun, memorable, and affordable event!

Buy UrbanNites Tickets

LET’S GET SOCIAL:
Share and invite friends to the UrbanNites at the Opera Facebook page! And be sure to tag and hashtag photos with @AustinOpera, #UrbanNites and #AustinOpera.

Access Opera – THE BARBER OF SEVILLE Dress Rehearsal

Access Opera

Access Opera offers free tickets to students, parents and teachers to attend Austin Opera dress rehearsals at The Long Center for the Performing Arts. Prior to each rehearsal, TEKS-aligned Study Guides are available to prepare students for the experience of attending the opera. Students see and hear the work with an enhanced appreciation that helps create a deeper relationship for the art form. Access Opera is often the first opportunity for many participants to experience live opera.

Austin Opera docents are available to speak to your school group of 25 or more during the month leading up to each dress rehearsal. Docents talk about attending what it is like to attend the opera, and provide a historical and cultural context for the opera students will see. Click HERE for a transcript of our recent docent lecture for Gounod’s Romeo & Juliet.

For more information about docents or tickets, please contact Erin Horan, Education and Administrative Coordinator, 512-610-7689 or ehoran@AustinOpera.org.

The Barber of Seville Dress Rehearsal
April 21, 2016 – 7:00 PM
The Long Center for the Performing Arts
Tickets open to public: March 21, 2016

*Access Opera events are very popular and can sell out quickly. Seating is limited based on availability.*

Access Opera – OF MICE AND MEN Dress Rehearsal

Access Opera

Access Opera offers free tickets to students, parents and teachers to attend Austin Opera dress rehearsals at The Long Center for the Performing Arts. Prior to each rehearsal, TEKS-aligned Study Guides are available to prepare students for the experience of attending the opera. Students see and hear the work with an enhanced appreciation that helps create a deeper relationship for the art form. Access Opera is often the first opportunity for many participants to experience live opera.

Austin Opera docents are available to speak to your school group of 25 or more during the month leading up to each dress rehearsal. Docents talk about attending what it is like to attend the opera, and provide a historical and cultural context for the opera students will see. Click HERE for a transcript of our recent docent lecture for Gounod’s Romeo & Juliet.

For more information about docents or tickets, please contact Erin Horan, Education and Administrative Coordinator, 512-610-7689 or ehoran@AustinOpera.org.

Of Mice and Men Dress Rehearsal
January 21, 2016 – 7:00 PM
The Long Center for the Performing Arts
Tickets open to public: December 7, 2015

*Access Opera events are very popular and can sell out quickly. Seating is limited based on availability.*

Access Opera – AIDA Dress Rehearsal

Access Opera

Access Opera offers free tickets to students, parents and teachers to attend Austin Opera dress rehearsals at The Long Center for the Performing Arts. Prior to each rehearsal, TEKS-aligned Study Guides are available to prepare students for the experience of attending the opera. Students see and hear the work with an enhanced appreciation that helps create a deeper relationship for the art form. Access Opera is often the first opportunity for many participants to experience live opera.

Austin Opera docents are available to speak to your school group of 25 or more during the month leading up to each dress rehearsal. Docents talk about attending what it is like to attend the opera, and provide a historical and cultural context for the opera students will see. Click HERE for a transcript of our recent docent lecture for Gounod’s Romeo & Juliet.

For more information about docents or tickets, please contact Erin Horan, Education and Administrative Coordinator, 512-610-7689 or ehoran@AustinOpera.org.

Aida Dress Rehearsal
November 5, 2015 – 7:00 PM
The Long Center for the Performing Arts
Tickets open to public: October 5, 2015

Aida Access Opera Study Guide

*Access Opera events are very popular and can sell out quickly. Seating is limited based on availability.*

Sunday Matinee Music Camp – AIDA

ALO Logo MUSIC CAMP

Austin Opera offers opera-loving parents a chance to enjoy the Austin Opera’s Sunday matinee performances while their children enjoy an afternoon of music, games, arts and fun.

The Sunday Matinee Music Camp program is led by teachers from Armstrong Community Music School and provides cultural enrichment for kids ages 4 to 10 years old. Kids participate in fun music lessons and games, movement activities, and opera-related crafts. Space is limited, so reserve your spot today!

ABOUT SUNDAY MATINEE MUSIC CAMP Adults must purchase a ticket to the opera and attend the performance. Matinee Music Camp is held in the AT&T Room on the ground floor of The Long Center. This is a secure room with easy access to exits and bathrooms. Children will not be allowed to leave the room without supervision by at least one Austin Opera/ACMS staff member of volunteer.

Snacks are provided for children during the camp. Children may also bring their own snacks from home. Please alert staff ahead of time about any special needs, restrictions, allergies, etc.

Adults will be asked to sign a waiver and leave their seat locations and cell phone numbers with staff at check-in. In case of emergency, Austin Opera staff will locate parents by seat number and/or be sent a text message to their cell phones. (We ask that cell phones be kept on silent or vibrate in consideration of other opera attendees.)

Sample Sunday Matinee Music Camp Schedule

  • 1:30-2:00 – Composer coloring sheets and music listening
  • 2:00-2:30 – Music class time
  • 2:30-2:45 – Snack break
  • 2:45-3:15 – Music Game time
  • 3:15-3:45 – Music class time
  • 3:45-4:15 – Make your own instruments craft time
  • 4:15-4:30 – Snack break
  • 4:30-5:00 – Composer coloring sheets and music listening
  • 5:00-5:30 – Finish craft projects and movie time
  • 5:45-6:00 – Snack time
  • 6:30 – Children must be picked up

TICKETS AND RESERVATIONS: Ticket buyers taking advantage of Sunday Matinee Music Camp will be seated in aisle seats to allow better access to entrances and exits.

Matinee Music Camp is $20 per child, payable at time of ticket purchase. Existing ticket holders for this performance are invited to call Patron Services to reserve a space for their children. Space is limited, so it is recommended that you register your child for the Sunday Matinee Music Camp early.

To purchase tickets and register your children for the Music Camp, please click HERE or call Patron Services at 512-610-7684.

Sunday Matinee Music Camp – OF MICE AND MEN

ALO Logo MUSIC CAMP

Austin Opera offers opera-loving parents a chance to enjoy the Austin Opera’s Sunday matinee performances while their children enjoy an afternoon of music, games, arts and fun.

The Sunday Matinee Music Camp program is led by teachers from Armstrong Community Music School and provides cultural enrichment for kids ages 4 to 10 years old. Kids participate in fun music lessons and games, movement activities, and opera-related crafts. Space is limited, so reserve your spot today!

ABOUT SUNDAY MATINEE MUSIC CAMP Adults must purchase a ticket to the opera and attend the performance. Matinee Music Camp is held in the AT&T Room on the ground floor of The Long Center. This is a secure room with easy access to exits and bathrooms. Children will not be allowed to leave the room without supervision by at least one Austin Opera/ACMS staff member of volunteer.

Snacks are provided for children during the camp. Children may also bring their own snacks from home. Please alert staff ahead of time about any special needs, restrictions, allergies, etc.

Adults will be asked to sign a waiver and leave their seat locations and cell phone numbers with staff at check-in. In case of emergency, Austin Opera staff will locate parents by seat number and/or be sent a text message to their cell phones. (We ask that cell phones be kept on silent or vibrate in consideration of other opera attendees.)

Sample Sunday Matinee Music Camp Schedule

  • 1:30-2:00 – Composer coloring sheets and music listening
  • 2:00-2:30 – Music class time
  • 2:30-2:45 – Snack break
  • 2:45-3:15 – Music Game time
  • 3:15-3:45 – Music class time
  • 3:45-4:15 – Make your own instruments craft time
  • 4:15-4:30 – Snack break
  • 4:30-5:00 – Composer coloring sheets and music listening
  • 5:00-5:30 – Finish craft projects and movie time
  • 5:45-6:00 – Snack time
  • 6:30 – Children must be picked up

TICKETS AND RESERVATIONS: Ticket buyers taking advantage of Sunday Matinee Music Camp will be seated in aisle seats to allow better access to entrances and exits.

Matinee Music Camp is $20 per child, payable at time of ticket purchase. Existing ticket holders for this performance are invited to call Patron Services to reserve a space for their children. Space is limited, so it is recommended that you register your child for the Sunday Matinee Music Camp early.

To purchase tickets and register your children for the Music Camp, please click HERE or call Patron Services at 512-610-7684.

Sunday Matinee Music Camp – THE BARBER OF SEVILLE

ALO Logo MUSIC CAMP

Austin Opera offers opera-loving parents a chance to enjoy the Austin Opera’s Sunday matinee performances while their children enjoy an afternoon of music, games, arts and fun.

The Sunday Matinee Music Camp program is led by teachers from Armstrong Community Music School and provides cultural enrichment for kids ages 4 to 10 years old. Kids participate in fun music lessons and games, movement activities, and opera-related crafts. Space is limited, so reserve your spot today!

ABOUT SUNDAY MATINEE MUSIC CAMP Adults must purchase a ticket to the opera and attend the performance. Matinee Music Camp is held in the AT&T Room on the ground floor of The Long Center. This is a secure room with easy access to exits and bathrooms. Children will not be allowed to leave the room without supervision by at least one Austin Opera/ACMS staff member of volunteer.

Snacks are provided for children during the camp. Children may also bring their own snacks from home. Please alert staff ahead of time about any special needs, restrictions, allergies, etc.

Adults will be asked to sign a waiver and leave their seat locations and cell phone numbers with staff at check-in. In case of emergency, Austin Opera staff will locate parents by seat number and/or be sent a text message to their cell phones. (We ask that cell phones be kept on silent or vibrate in consideration of other opera attendees.)

Sample Sunday Matinee Music Camp Schedule

  • 1:30-2:00 – Composer coloring sheets and music listening
  • 2:00-2:30 – Music class time
  • 2:30-2:45 – Snack break
  • 2:45-3:15 – Music Game time
  • 3:15-3:45 – Music class time
  • 3:45-4:15 – Make your own instruments craft time
  • 4:15-4:30 – Snack break
  • 4:30-5:00 – Composer coloring sheets and music listening
  • 5:00-5:30 – Finish craft projects and movie time
  • 5:45-6:00 – Snack time
  • 6:30 – Children must be picked up

TICKETS AND RESERVATIONS: Ticket buyers taking advantage of Sunday Matinee Music Camp will be seated in aisle seats to allow better access to entrances and exits.

Matinee Music Camp is $20 per child, payable at time of ticket purchase. Existing ticket holders for this performance are invited to call Patron Services to reserve a space for their children. Space is limited, so it is recommended that you register your child for the Sunday Matinee Music Camp early.

To purchase tickets and register your children for the Music Camp, please click HERE or call Patron Services at 512-610-7684.

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Austin Opera Patron Services
512-610-7684; Monday-Friday: 9am-5pm

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512-474-5664
Monday-Friday:10 am – 6 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 4 pm
Sunday: open during scheduled performances